Reply To: Why not PHP?

#2787
AllenJB83
Guest

This is a terrible article the, in my opinion, is written by someone with little to no knowledge of PHP and its community.

**It’s mainly for serving simple HTTP requests**

While it has a great process model for serving simple HTTP requests with minimal setup, this is certainly not all it can do. It’s quite easy using any of a number of libraries to set up long-running application servers in the same model as other languages / platforms, and while you wouldn’t use any of the web-specific SAPIs for this like php-fpm, they don’t get in the way of it either.

**It’s (relatively) old**

Age is not a factor you should use in decision making in this way. Old does not mean “has been” / “old hat” / “not modern”.

Even a brief look at the recent version changelogs and migration guides as well as the wider ecosystem of libraries and frameworks will quickly show that PHP continues to evolve as a language at a pace rivaling any other.

**No large corporate backers**

No corporate overlords can be an advantage as much as a disadvantage. PHP not being governed by corporate overlords means it’s not going to be abandoned overnight or left to rot when its parent gets bored or goes bust.

Nikita is not the only core developer paid to work on PHP core. Microsoft pay developers to work on PHP (they are winding down their provision of official Windows builds, but will still be contributing to PHP – [source](https://externals.io/message/110985#110985)). I’m fairly certain Remi Collet works for RedHat. I’m pretty sure there are others – they just don’t shout it from the rooftops.

This also ignores the awesome amount of libraries and support available in the wider PHP ecosystem, much of it developed by companies or their developers working on company time.

To insinuate that no corporation uses or values PHP to this extent is bogus.

**Many beginners, few experts**

More bogus claims. There are plenty of experts in the PHP community who are continually providing excellent resources including excellent [books](https://leanpub.com/bookstore/book?category=php), [guidance](https://phptherightway.com/), podcasts, video and written tutorials.

Does PHP, as an easy to pickup and popular language, have a problem with blogspam out-of-date tutorials everywhere? Yes. But any popular language has this problem, and the older and more popular it is, the bigger the problem. But there’s far from a dearth of quality content.

**It has many minor potholes**

While the core language can appear inconsistent at times, there’s actually very reasonable explanations behind the vast majority of these inconsistencies. If you take the time to look at how PHP has evolved from its origins as a relatively simple glue between libraries, most of these fade away. “Modern tooling” (ie. basic autocomplete) pretty much takes care of the rest.

**Where do we go from here?**

This isn’t “where do we go from here”, this is “where was the language 3 years ago”. Catch up already.